Characters

Worked on 27 December 2012

Charles S. Abell

ABELL, Charles S. Assistant Secretary of Defense Principal Deputy for the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense.  Served as Assistant Secretary of Defense (Force Management Policy) from 8 May 2001 to 14 November 2002.

ADAMS, Wayne T.  Brigadier General. Commanding officer at El Toro AFB in 1991. Was forced into early retirement due to allegations that he abused military aircraft for personal excursions.

AGENBROAD, Jerry.  Colonel.  On February 24, l995, five days after “60 Minutes” did a story on the illegal C-130 acquisitions, Colonel Jerry Agenbroad was found hanging in the Bachelor Officers Quarters at El Toro. He was in charge of MWR at the time of his death and at one time headed the air museum [one aspect of Iran-Contra was the “sale” of working aircraft from air museums to the CIA or their contractors].

ALBIN, Gary, Lieutenant Colonel.   Lieutenant Colonel Gary Albin was returning some flight manuals to Sabow the morning he was murdered. Getting no answer, Albin decided to wait on the porch and try again.  This probably saved Sally Sabow’s life as the original intent was probably to murder of Sally and “suicide” of James.

BALDWIN, Cheryl.   NCIS, Crime Scene Investigator

BARBEE, Peter, Captain USMC.   A Marine Corps officer. In 1985, Barbee was a Captain in the Marine Corps in Tustin, CA serving as a helicopter aircraft commander. Barbee was selected for a degree completion program, so he left the Marines for two years to obtain a BA at the University of California at Irvine.  During this time, Col Sabow became aware of drugs on the base at El Toro. He and his staff decided to use undercover methods to find out how the drugs were getting there. Somebody recommended Barbee, who, had a rapport with the troops. In the latter part of 1987, Col. Sabow contacted Barbee and discussed his concern about drug trafficking within the El Toro and Tustin bases.  Source: “The Strange Death of Colonel Sabow” by Gary Null, PhD.

BEDELL, John Patrick.  Pentagon subway shooter obsessed with death of Col. James Sabow, USMC.  From Hollster, CA

BEISSNER, James was the Orange County Coroner.

BURNETT, Bryan.   Court-certified gunshot residue analyst and crime scene reconstruct. He may have been the one that discovered the doctored crime scene photo of JS in which the welt on the back of his head was photo shopped out. He may have performed a crime scene reconstruction of the event.

BUSH, George H. W.  CIA Director 30 January 1976 to 20 January 1977.

CALERO, Adolfo, Contra leader alleged to be engaged in Iran-Contra drugs for guns trafficking in and out of USA with CIA proprietary company support.

CALLAHAN, Bill.  Colonel.   Jim Sabow’s best friend. He may be able to refute all the allegations the JS was going to be formally charged with before his death.

CASEY, Bill.  Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) close to Representative Bull McCollum (FL), who was implicated in the Florida-based CIA drug-running operations.

CASTILLO, Celerino.  Former DEA agent Celerino Castillo, along with Dave Harmon, gave the following account in their 1994 book, Powder Burns: Cocaine, Contras and the Drug War: “… every pilot had his own preferred technique for getting his illegal payload to U.S. soil. Some liked the John Wayne approach, flashing their CIA credentials at Florida airfields and unloading the drugs in plain view. Those who wanted to maintain a lower profile shipped the kilos out in innocuous cargoes like towels, seafood, frozen vegetables or auto parts. Many landed at military bases around the United States, knowing no one would inspect a Contra plane….”

COLLINGWOOD, FNU.  Congressional liaison and public affairs officer for the FBI, a man by the name of Collingwood, signed letter to Dr. Sabow stating, in essence, that the FBI had already conducted investigations into the matter in 1993, and had found absolutely no evidence of foul play. They were sorry that his brother was dead, but it was over. The FBI didn’t want any part of it. (Gary Null, “The Strange Death of Colonel Sabow,” Pacifica Radio Network, no date provided.)

COLLINS, Fred.  FBI Special Agent, FBI Agents Bill Grode and Fred Collins of the north central FBI district in Minneapolis sent a report on the case to Washington. Sabow subsequently learned that from Washington it had been referred to the Los Angeles FBI bureau but that “it was too hot to handle” and sent back to Washington….

CRAYCRAFT, FNU.  NCIS Special Agent.  Approximately one week after Sabow’s death, NCIS Special Agent Craycraft visited Sally. According to Sally, the agent told her, “I could swear it was Joe [Underwood]. I just can’t pin it on him.”  “Review of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service Investigation into the Death of Colonel James Emery Sabow, United States Marine Corps,” Office of the Inspector General, Department of Defense, 6/5/96, p. 23, copy in author’s possession. According to the OIG report, Craycraft denied making this statement.

DASCHLE, Tom, Senator.  [Then] Senator Tom Daschle is currently working with Sabow. His plan is to request a special Senate inquiry and a meeting with Janet Reno and Louis Free in the hopes of obtaining a federal grand jury investigation.[

DAVIS, J. K. Major General, USMC.   Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps from 1 July 1983 to 31 May 1986.  Had dinner with General Adams, General Davison [OIG] at Adams’ residence the evening of 1/18/91. JS calls him the night before his death (1/21/91)

DAVISON, Hollis, General USMC.   Inspector General for the Marine Corps arrived at ET AFB to investigate supposed misuse of military aircraft by Col. Underwood.

FACKLER, Martin L. Colonel USA (Ret).  Medical Corps, he was a battlefield surgeon, and the head of the Wound Ballistics Laboratory for the US Army’s Medical Training Center, Letterman Institute. Fackler examined the autopsy report of JS and concluded that:

“The position of the shotgun (under his body) and the lack of gross blood on the front of the white garments that Col. Sabow was wearing at the time of his death make suicide appear, to me, unlikely….”

“The amount of blood, and edema, found at the autopsy in Col. Sabow’s lungs would seem, to me, to indicate that he took at least a dozen breaths after the shot. The structures destroyed by the shot, would seem to preclude this: the autopsy report states “No intact brainstem, including midbrain, pons, or cerebral peduncle is identified.:

“The fact that none of Col. Sabow’s fingerprints were found on the shotgun seems strange to me, but the techniques of fingerprinting are out of my field of expertise. One of the reasons given, however, for the lack of fingerprints – that the barrel gets so hot that any fingerprints on it would be burned off – is simply absurd. This is within my area of expertise: I have handled many shotguns immediately after they have been fired – the barrels are not even hot to the touch.”

“Since no blood went out the back of his head, I would expect more of it to blow back and be over things in the front of him. As far as I’m concerned, that’s the most supportive evidence to support Dr. Sabow’s beliefs.”

FELDMAN, Jack PhD.   Chairman of the Department of Neuroscience at UCLA. He lectures worldwide and has published over 500 treatises on how the nervous system controls breathing. Dr. Feldman reviewed the JS autopsy report and couldn’t understand how blood entered the lungs as JS would’ve died instantly because his brain vaporized after the gunshot wound making breathing impossible.  Dr. Jack Feldman writes and signs an affidavit stating,

“Colonel Sabow was rendered unconscious or immobile by a blow to the head that fractured the base of the skull, causing bleeding into the pharynx. Breathing continued after this injury, aspirating blood into the lung. Sometime later, a shotgun was placed in the mouth and triggered, causing death and obscuring any evidence of prior injury.”

FIX, Ron. Colonel.  According to Lt. Col. Craig Roberts, retired Army officer, former Marine and noted investigative journalist: “The Navy and Marines have a section on each base that deals with the morale, welfare and recreation of the personnel and families. It used to be called “Special Services,” where you could check out sports equipment or play games, pool, etc. It has expanded and now personnel are assigned to maintain a facility, organize events, meetings, and handle all recreational or civilian related activities. The Morale Officer is a regular officer with other duties that has this as an additional duty assignment.”  [*] Colonel Ron Fix was in charge of this department and, among other duties, was in charge of letting all civilian contracts, including those for proprietary airlines. He also was capable of making the arrangements for acquisitions and dispersal of planes through the base air museum.

FOUQUER, FNU Captain, Deputy Provost Marshall.  Several minutes after the fatal shot was fired, the Provost Marshall, Major Goodrow and his deputy, Captain Fouquer arrived on the scene. Their radio dispatch was intercepted by Sergeant Randy Robinson, an M.P. patrolling in the vicinity, who arrived a minute later.

FREEH, Louis Joseph. served as the fifth Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation from September 1993 to June 2001.

FRIEND, Bob.  Major USMC.   Interviewed by the Inspector General about JS misconduct. Apparently he claimed that the official transcript of the interview didn’t match what he said.

FUCHS

GARZA, Eddie. Cousin to Rudy Garza.  Like his cousin, Eddie Garza was involved in a great deal of violence and drug trafficking….

GARZA, Rudy.  Drug dealer, attacked Marine Pete Barbee who killed him and was in turn sentence to one and a half years in prison by a local court and police system that appear to have been in the drug dealer’s pockets.   While in jail, Barbee was threatened and beaten. He was told he would be killed in jail. At one point, Barbee was moved from his cell block to another one, right next to Rudy Garza’s cousin, Eddie. Like his cousin, Eddie Garza was involved in a great deal of violence and drug trafficking….

GOODROW, FNU Major, Provost Marshall, USMC.  Several minutes after the fatal shot was fired, the Provost Marshall, Major Goodrow and his deputy, Captain Fouquer arrived on the scene. Their radio dispatch was intercepted by Sergeant Randy Robinson, an M.P. patrolling in the vicinity, who arrived a minute later.

General Al Gray, USMC CMC

GRAY, Alfred Jr., General, Commandant of the Marine Corps from 1 July 1987.  The memo that General Adams drafted regarding Sabow’s alleged suicide was addressed to him.  Gray is a veteran of the CIA-DoD assassination program in Viet-Nam, the Pheonix Program.

GRIGGS, George, Colonel.  In 1987 Herndon was Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps under General Al Gray. One of Gray’s immediate subordinates was Colonel George Griggs. As Grigg’s wife, Kay Pollard Griggs, told the author, “Army General Carl Stiner, Marine General Jim Joy, General Charles Wilhelm, head of Marine Southern Command – part of Joint Special Operations Command, and my husband who worked under him at the State Department – they’re all Al Gray’s boys. They do the assassinations. Say if they’ve got someone who’s talking too much. Gray will say, ‘We’ve got a problem….’[*]  According to Griggs, Gray is heavily involved in drug-smuggling. Herndon was stationed in Panama – a key drug transshipment point – and had a key position with Special Operations (CIA), training death squads in Central America.  “They train assassins,” says Griggs. “It’s called the Phoenix Program, but it involves mind-control…. It’s an old boy network, it’s an institution, and it’s run through the State Department….[*]  As Griggs says, “Herndon is one of Al Gray’s boys.”  According to Griggs, Steiner, Linda Tripp’s boss, was the head of the JFK assassin school (a nickname). Joy was with the Delta Force, and according to Griggs, trained the operatives that went into Waco and were involved in abducting Panamanian President Manuel Noriega.

GRODE, Bill, FBI Special Agent. FBI Agents Bill Grode and Fred Collins of the north central FBI district in Minneapolis sent a report on the case to Washington. Sabow subsequently learned that from Washington it had been referred to the Los Angeles FBI bureau but that “it was too hot to handle” and sent back to Washington.

HANEY, Julie.  NCIS Investigator took on the Sabow case in 2010.

HARRIES, Betsy, Captain, Provost Marshall.   Mr. Wheaton alleged that Mr. Robinson had informed him that Col. Underwood had directed the Provost Marshal, Capt. Betsy Harries, to keep all military policemen away from the unidentified aircraft while they were on the airfield.  “In our interview of Mr. Robinson, he stated that on one occasion he had gone to Col. Underwood’s office to brief him on an investigation and that Capt. Harries had accompanied him. During the conversation the topic of aircraft landing late at night came up and Col. Underwood told them “Keep your ass off the airstrip at night. Leave those airplanes alone. Don’t go near them. Don’t worry about them….”[OIG report, p. 24.] (See Appendix)  According to the OIG report, Harries would later deny this, and control tower personal, and emergency fire and rescue personnel would deny any knowledge of the landings.

HENDRICKS, Chuck, C-130 Crew.   Chuck Hendricks and Bob Weldon, crew members on a C-l30, were killed in Angola when their plane crashed. The plane was registered to St. Lucia Airline which was formed by Oliver North and Ted Shackley. The cargo included small arms and other weapons. Hendricks was from Mena, Arkansas.  Weldon is the nephew of Congressman Curt Weldon of Pennsylvania.

HERNDON

HUNTER, Duncan.  Congressman that passed the HR Act to re-investigate the death of James Sabow.

JACOBS, Mike.  Orange County DA, belived the JS was murdered.

LANG III, George Colonel.   USMC Deputy Staff Judge Advocate in Washington.  Apparently dictated a “script” stating their intention to convince Dr. Sabow that his brother’s death was a suicide. The call was made on March 8, l99l, the day before Sabow was to meet with General Adams.

Eric Lichtblau

LICHTBLAU, Eric.  Now with the New York Time, at the time with the Los Angeles Times after years of work as an investigative reporter covering the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C.  Earned a Pulitzer Prize in 2006 for national reporting.  He was the primary reporter on the Sabow story and evidently it was decided early on by his editors that he was not to apply his considerable investigative reporting skills to this specific case.

LUCAS,

MARTIN

MCBRIDE, Paul, Captain USMC.  Legal counsel for James Sabow when he was being investigated by the OIG.

MORGAN, Thomas R. General.  Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps from 1 June 1986.  Got to know CIA aviation in Viet-Nam 1968-1969.

NAKASONE, Burt.  NCIS, Forensic Officer

NORDBY, Jon Dr. PhD.  Forensic medical specialisty hired by DoD to refute the evidence.

NULL, Gary.  Dr.  Radio talk show host and health author.

William “Tosh” Plumlee

PLUMLEE, William “Tosh.”  Testified to the Kerry Commission that he flew C-130s into El Toro AFB filled with drugs and then flew back to South America with cache’s of weapons.

POAGUE

POINDEXTER, John.  Admiral, National Security Advisor to President Ronald Reagan in 1980’s during Iran-Contra.

QUIG

REMLEY

RICH, Wayne, Colonel.   Assistant Attorney General of the United States [??]   Present at a meeting between David Sabow, General Wayne Adams, General David Shuter and General J.K. Davis at El Toro AFB after it was learned that DS was going to go to the LA TIMES and complain that he was being stonewalled regarding evidence (autopsy, fingerprint etc.) of the investigation into the death of JS.  U.S. Department of Agriculture program named “Screw Worm,”  [??]

ROBINSON, Randy, Sergeant.  MP who was patrolling the area when Gen. Adams made a radio call to the provost martial Maj. Goodrow and his deputy Capt. Fouquer. He is the third person to arrive at the scene. At the scene he observed several NIS personnel handling the shotgun without gloves. May have witnessed crime scene tampering.

ROSS, Ricky.  Celebrated black entrepreneur who converted Nicaguan Contra drugs from Blandon, possibly brought in by CIA via El Toro, into the crack cocaine Explosion.

RUBINSTEIN, David Dr.  Radiologist, Denver’s University Hospital wrote, “The depressed skull fracture… is not likely to have resulted from the shotgun blast. What caused the depressed fracture is open to speculation. It is unlikely to have occurred if the patient fell backwards and struck the ground.”

SABOW, Deirdre.   Daughter; was a sophomore at Mater Dei HS in 1991.

Col James E. Sabow, USMC (RIP)

SABOW, James E. Colonel.  Vietnam vet that flew over 200 sorties during the war and was awarded with a Bronze Star. Eight days before his death he was promoted to the position of Acting Chief of Staff of Marine Corps Air Operations for the Western United States.

SCHOU, Nick.  Journalist for the Orange County Weekly, the most active investigative journalist pursuing the case since its inception.

SCOTT, Archibald.  Friend of Jim Sabow and Underwood. Was at a meeting that took place on 1/21 at Underwoods’ residence where JS told him that, “Quitters never win and winners never quit.”

SEGOVIA

SHACKLEY, Ted.  Christic asserts that the Secret Team is headed by defendant Theodore Shackley, who served as CIA Deputy Director in charge of worldwide covert operations under the agency’s former director, George Bush.

SHEEHAN, Danny.  Counsel hired by David Sabow to investigate the death of JS.

SHUTER

SINGHANIA, Aruna.  Dr.   Performed the autopsy in Orange County on JS.

SPITZ, Werner.   Professor of Pathology at Wayne State University School of Medicine and one of the most well known forensic pathologist in the world.

STOTLER

SUNDERVAN

SWAILS

TAYLOR, Bill

UNDERWOOD, Joseph. Colonel.   2nd in command at El Toro AFB in 1991. Was forced into early retirement due to allegations that he abused military aircraft for personal reasons. He was the next door neighbor to Col. James Sabow. He is a suspect in the death of Sabow. In 1980-1981 he was under investigation by the NIS (Naval Investigation Service) for smuggling $300-$400k worth of contraband into the US. The NIS investigation lasted for 10 months and then dropped the charges for “unknown reasons.”

VERDUCCI, Anthony, Captain later Colonel.   “The entire matter was bizarre, according to Captain Anthony Verducci from the JAG office,” says Sabow. “The alleged victim never filed a complaint before Robinson’s arrest and never testified in court against him.”   Colonel Lucas ordered Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Verducci to write a JAGMAN report – a non-criminal investigation, concurrent with the NCIS report. As Verducci writes in a letter to Dr. Sabow: “He (Lucas) made it clear that I was not to investigate the matters that the IG had investigated. He told me that the family had endured enough pain and that they should be spared any additional allegations and investigations. Colonel Lucas reminded me that NCIS was conducting the criminal investigation, and told me I should be able to satisfy the requirements of the JAGMAN without bothering the family or waiting for a complete NCIS investigation.” Verducci added that he thought “that Colonel Sabow did not die of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.” (letter of Lt. Col. Anthony J. Verducci, USMC, 3/25/99, copy in author’s possession.)   Colonel Verducci, a JAG officer at the time of the murder, has said on record that Colonel Sabow was murdered. He was assigned by Colonel Lucas to do the first JAGMAN (Judge Advocate General Manual) investigation in the death. Verducci stated that after he was assigned to conduct the re-investigation by the Commanding General, Drax Williams, Colonel Walker in the JAG office gave him a yellow-pad that was compiled by Colonel Lange containing a list of items which were to be the official findings of the re-investigation. Verducci refused to be a part of this scheme. Consequently, he was relieved of the responsibility of conducting the investigation. As Verducci states, “This was nothing more than me reviewing the death certificate stating the name, age and address of Colonel Sabow, much like you would quote in a newspaper obituary.” He was told not to wait for any of the criminal material from NCIS.

WADE, Tom, Sergeant.  On January 12, 1991, Inspector General Hollis Davison’s team visited El Toro.[*] The first place they went was to Building 53 – the records department. They ordered Sergeant Felix Segovia to access the command staff computers. Segovia assigned this task to Sergeant Tom Wade, his networking specialist. When Wade accessed the MWR computers, he discovered that they were completely “purged.” There was absolutely nothing in their memory, not even a program!  Arriving home from church services on Christmas Day, l994, Sergeant Tom Wade was dragged from his car as his four-year old daughter watched, then shot in the head, execution style. The girl spent the night whimpering in the car.
Even though the killing occurred off-base in a civilian apartment complex, the Marines cordoned off Wade’s apartment, not allowing the local police to investigate. The County Sheriff informed Gene Wheaton (who was working for Dr. Sabow) that the Marines sealed Wade’s apartment before local law enforcement agencies could conduct their investigation, on the grounds of “national security.” Wade’s death remains a mystery.[*]

WALKER, FNU Colonel.  Verducci stated that after he was assigned to conduct the re-investigation by the Commanding General, Drax Williams, Colonel Walker in the JAG office gave him a yellow-pad that was compiled by Colonel Lange containing a list of items which were to be the official findings of the re-investigation. Verducci refused to be a part of this scheme. Consequently, he was relieved of the responsibility of conducting the investigation.

WHEATON, Gene.  A retired military investigator, learned about David Sabow from an LA TIMES article and offered his help.

WILHELM, Charles, General.  In 1987 Herndon was Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps under General Al Gray. One of Gray’s immediate subordinates was Colonel George Griggs. As Grigg’s wife, Kay Pollard Griggs, told the author, “Army General Carl Stiner, Marine General Jim Joy, General Charles Wilhelm, head of Marine Southern Command – part of Joint Special Operations Command, and my husband who worked under him at the State Department – they’re all Al Gray’s boys. They do the assassinations. Say if they’ve got someone who’s talking too much. Gray will say, ‘We’ve got a problem….’[*]

WILLIAMS, Leslie, Captain.  Captain Leslie Williams, who had worked for and admired Colonel Sabow, was extremely critical of the accusations against him, and made her feelings known. In spite of high ratings given her performance, she was “passed over” for promotion and forced to resign.

WILLWORTH, Jim, Journalist with TIME Magazine.  Dr. Sabow informed Jim Willworth, an investigative reporter for Time magazine, about Barbee, and he subsequently interviewed him in depth several times. Willworth later told Dr. Sabow, “I’ve done this business for 28 years. This man is legitimate.” After Jim Willworth’s interview, the prosecution changed the charge against Barbee from first-degree murder to manslaughter….