Timeline & EEI

Updated 8 December 2012

Chain of Command for Murder
Click on Image to Enlarge

EEI: Essential Elements of Information still lacking — questions that have not been asked or answered.

01  Photographs of crime scene from family showing the 2″ x 4″ at gate that disappeared and was probably used to knock Col Sabow unconscious; search of area for debris, both EL Toro and areas around Camp Pendleton flight pad and former home of the Counter-Terrorism/International Response unit.

02  Due diligence by Marine Corps to identify helicopter, pilot & co-pilot if any, and passengers from Camp Pendleton to El Toro including identi-sketch by living MPs and comparison with faces of all then serving at the International Rapid Response unit.

03  Why did Eric Lichtblau of the Los Angeles Times accept the Marine Corps cover story and not investigate the murder; the improper sale of aircraft from the Marine Corps air museum to CIA cover companies, and CIA drug running into El Toro?

04  Proper professional interrogation of the individuals on the WANTED list in association with Congressional hearing (05)

05  Congressionally-mandated disclosure of all internal records from Marine Corps, DoD, and Department of Justice inclusive of the names and full contact information for each and every member of each staff directly engaged in each of the various investigations, with special and immediate emphasis on those that traveled to El Toro and failed to do their duty by their Constitutional Oaths of office and/or commissioning.  SPECIAL INTEREST:  all records related to the assumption by General Carl E. Mundy, Jr. of the position of the Commandant, with respect to El Toro, the death of Col Sabor, and Marine Corps support to the CIA.

06  Congressional hearing of selective testimony, with closure in terms of absolute immunity for all who testify or have been debriefed

Closure

01  Public disclosure and apology by the serving Commandant (Aviation) to Dr. James Sabow, Mrs. Sally Sabow, and all concerned.  On film.

02  Recommended DoD IG investigation into all military support to CIA today, and development of proper oversight procedures eliminating CIA abuse of military support.

George H. W. Bush

1976

January

30

George H. W. Bush becomes Director of Central Intelligence He served in this role for 357 days, from January 30, 1976 to January 20, 1977.[28] The CIA had been rocked by a series of revelations, including those based on investigations by the Church Committee regarding illegal and unauthorized activities by the CIA, and Bush was credited with helping to restore the agency’s morale.

1977

January

20

George H. W. Bush resigns as Director of Central Intelligence, becoming chairman on the Executive Committee of the First International Bank in Houston.  Between 1977 and 1979, he was a director of the Council on Foreign Relations foreign policy organization.

1981

January

Major Oliver North, USMC began his assignment to the National Security Council (NSC), serving as the deputy director for political-military affairs.  He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in 1983 and he was reassigned in 1986 after being dismissed by Ronald Reagan in November 1986, as the sale of weapons was made public i1982 [see Boland Amendment]

July

01

 

General Paul X. Kelley

General Paul X. Kelley, Paul XAssistant Commandant of the Marine Corps (1 July 1981 – 30 June 1983), Commandant of the Marine Corps (1 July 1987 – 30 June 1987).

December

08

The Boland Amendment was the name given to three U.S. legislative amendments between 1982 and 1984, all aimed at limiting U.S. government assistance to the Contras in Nicaragua. The first Boland Amendment was to the House Appropriations Bill of 1982, which was attached as a rider to the Defense Appropriations Act of 1983, named for the Massachusetts Democrat, Representative Edward Patrick Boland, who authored it. The House of Representatives passed the Defense Appropriations Act 411-0 on December 8, 1982 and it was signed by President Ronald Reagan on December 21, 1982.[1] The amendment outlawed U.S. assistance to the Contras for the purpose of overthrowing the Nicaraguan government, while allowing assistance for other purposes.[2]  Beyond restricting overt U.S. support of the Contras, the most significant effect of the Boland Amendment was the Iran-Contra Affair, during which the Reagan Administration illegally circumvented the Amendment in order to continue supplying arms to the Contras, behind the back of Congress.

1983

July

01

General John K. Davis, USMC

General John K. DAVIS, John K. becomes Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps (Aviation) (1 July 1983 – 31 May 1986).  

Below awaiting data confirmation for placement.

Allegations were made, most notably by the Kerry Subcomitee, that North and other senior officials created a privatized Contra network that attracted drug traffickers looking for cover for their operations, then turned a blind eye to repeated reports of drug smuggling related to the Contras, and actively worked with known drug smugglers such as Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega to assist the Contras.[16] Most Contra associates found guilty of trafficking by the Kerry Committee were involved in the supply chain (ostensibly for “humanitarian goods,” though the supply chain was later found to have serviced the transport of arms), which had been set up by North. Organizations and individuals involved in the supply chain under investigation for trafficking included the company SETCO (operated by large-scale trafficker Juan Matta-Ballesteros), the fruit company Frigorificos de Puntarenas, rancher John Hull, and several Cuban Exiles; North and other US government officials were criticized by the Kerry Report for their practice of “ticket punching” for these parties, whereby people under active investigation for drug trafficking were given cover and pay by joining in the Contra supply chain. In addition to the Kerry Committee’s investigation, the Costa Rican government of Nobel-Prize winner Óscar Arias conducted an investigation of Contra-related drug trafficking, and as a result of this investigation, North and several other US Government officials were permanently banned from entering Costa Rica.

Barred from Costa Rica in 1989 for activities during this timeframe, along with North were Maj. Gen. Richard Secord, former National Security Advisor John Poindexter, former US Ambassador to Costa Rica, Lewis Tambs, and former CIA station chief in Costa Rica, Joseph Fernandez. This winter Costa Rica’s congress will vote on the permanent implementation of the bannings. In an interview with Extra!, Costa Rican Minister of Information, Jorge Urbina, stated: “I can assure you that the recommendations will pass nearly unanimously.” [FAIR.org Oct/Nov 1989]

1984

July

01

Joseph F. Fernandez (born c. 1937) was a Central Intelligence Agency station chief in Costa Rica (operating under the pseudonym Tomás Castillo) and a figure in the Iran-Contra Affair.  Joe Fernandez, a Cuban-American, was a protégé of Duane Clarridge in the early years of the Contra operation. When Clarridge was replaced by Alan Fiers as the CIA’s Central American point man, Fernandez allied himself with the National Security Council‘s Oliver North rather than Fiers. North and Fernandez sought to revive the anti-Sandinista cause in the south, blaming Edén Pastora‘s erratic leadership for the Democratic Revolutionary Alliance‘s moribund state. In early 1986, Fernandez convinced Pastora’s field commanders to join Fernando “El Negro” Chamorro, who had allied with the northern-based Nicaraguan Democratic Force. However, his efforts with North to build a strong Contra Southern Front, including aerial resupply of rebel forces in the south by Richard Secord‘s “Enterprise,” enmeshed him in the Iran-Contra Affair.  Fernandez was originally indicted June 20, 1988 on four counts of obstruction and false statements. The indictment of Fernandez represented the first time that a CIA chief of station had been charged with crimes committed in the course of his duties as a CIA officer. Following a venue change, a new indictment was made April 24, 1989. The case was dismissed November 24, 1989 when Attorney General Richard L. Thornburgh refused to declassify information needed for his defense.  After charges were dropped, he founded Guardian Technologies International with Oliver North.  [NEED DATE CHECK ON FERNANDEZ IN COSTA RICA, CROSS OVER WITH RODRIGUEZ AS C/LAD]

1985

July

12

Ollie North’s notebooks contain dozens of references to contra-related drug trafficking, includinga July 12, 1985 entry: “$14 million to finance [arms] came from drugs.” When high-ranking officials of the “Just Say No”administration are banned-due to drug links-from the country US editorial writers hail as Central America’s leading democracy, one might have expected major coverage. One would have been wrong. Although a lengthy Associated Press wire report (7/22/89) carried the story into virtually every newsroom in the US, major media largely ignored the story or, like the Washington Post and Miami Herald, relegated it to “in Brief” sections. The New York Time sand the three major TV networks failed to mention it at all. [FAIR.org Oct/Nov 1989]

December

07

First recorded note on White House initiative to trade arms for hostages in Iran. Handwritten notes taken by Defense Secretary Casper Weinberger on December 7, 1985 indicate that Reagan was aware of potential hostage transfers with Iran, as well as the sale of Hawk and TOW missiles to “moderates elements” within that country.

1986

June

General Thomas R. Morgan

01

General Thomas R. Morgan (Aviation) assumes duties as Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps.  Got to know CIA aviation in Viet-Nam 1968-1969.

August

23

According to the National Security Archive, in an August 23, 1986 e-mail to National Security Advisor John Poindexter, Oliver North described a meeting with a representative of Panamanian Dictator Manuel Noriega: “You will recall that over the years Manuel Noriega in Panama and I have developed a fairly good relationship,” North writes before explaining Noriega‘s proposal. If U.S. officials can “help clean up his image” and lift the ban on arms sales to the Panamanian Defense Force, Noriega will “‘take care of’ the Sandinista leadership for us.

November

Iran-Contra affair comes to light.  In the end, fourteen administration officials were indicted, including then-Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger. Eleven convictions resulted, some of which were vacated on appeal.[12] The rest of those indicted or convicted were all pardoned in the final days of the presidency of George H. W. Bush, [former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency] who had been vice-president at the time of the affair.

General Al Gray, USMC CMC
Click on Image for Biography

1987

July

01

General Al Gray (Infantry/Intelligence) becomes the 29th Commandant of the Marine Corps.  The Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps, appointed 1 June 1986, is General Thomas R. Morgan (Aviation).  General Morgan’s Viet-Nam service:  He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in July 1967. In August 1968, he reported to Marine Aircraft Group 13 at Chu Lai, serving as Group Operations Officer and then as Officer-in-Charge of the DaNang DASC in Vietnam. He returned to the United States in September 1969.

1987 / 00 / 00  Col James Sabow first raises concerns over drug running in and out of El Toro Marine Corps Air Base.

1990

September

01

MajGen Hollis  E. Davison assumes duty as Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff for Manpower and Reserve Affairs, for Reserve Affairs.

General Davison retired from active duty on January 1, 1992.

MajGen Hollis E. Davison

October

01

MajGen Hollis  E. Davison assumes additional duties as Deputy Naval Inspector General for Marine Corps Matters Inspector/General of the Marine Corps.

1991

January

12

Col. Underwood is relieved of his duties as Chief of Staff at El Toro AFB.

13

Col. Sabow returns to ET AFB, learns of Underwood’s dismissal. He phones his friend Bill Callahan to discuss the allegations.

16

BGen Wayne T. Adams

General Wayne T. Adams at ET AFB informs Col. Sabow that he is under investigation by the Inspector General’s office [Hollis Davison]

17

MajGen Hollis E. Davison

Capt. Paul McBride and Col. James Sabow have a meeting at the Law Center(?) with Inspector General Davison and his staff. Sabow is informed that he is being investigated for the alleged misuse of government aircraft. Immediately following the meeting, an aide directs Sabow to General Adams office where he is relieved of his duties. However, no “formal allegations” were made.

18

The OIG’s team hands over their allegations to Gen. Adams. That evening, General Adams, General Davison [OIG] and General J.K. Davis met for dinner at Adams’ residence.

19

General Davison and his staff return to Washington DC.

Col James E. Sabow, USMC
Last Day of Life

21

Col. Sabow meets with Col. Underwood and a mutual friend, Archibald Scott. Scott quoted Colonel Sabow as saying, “Quitters never win and winners never quit.” When JS returns home, his wife, Sally, recalls that he was “white as a ghost.” An hour later, Underwood stopped by and repeatedly tried to talk JS into accepting an early retirement to avoid a court-martial.

2300 – JS phones friend JK Davis and tells him. “I don’t care what they say, I’ll take this to a court martial.” Davis does not mention to JS about his meeting on 1/18 with Adams and Davison.

22

0530: JS awakes and showers.

0700: Col. Underwood calls JS and tells him about an LA TIMES article that Underwood has been relieved of his duties.

0720-0730: JS kisses his daughter Deirdre (sophomore Mater Dei HS) goodbye as she leaves the house.

0800 – General Adams is in a meeting at his office. Present at the meeting was the new Chief of Staff Col. Williams, Col. Lucas the chief legal officer, and Capt. Betsy Sweat the publicity officer.

0810 – JS talks on the phone with his lawyer Capt. McBride; one of three conversations the two had that morning.

0830 – Wife Sally leaves for church event in Irvine. JS is sitting in a chair in the living room watching the Gulf War [Operation Desert Shield] unfold on CNN. The family’s two dogs are in the backyard. The phone rings as SS is leaving. JS mutes the volume on the TV, answers the phone “Sabow” three times. [Phone records regarding who made this call???]

Click on Image to Enlarge
First Day of Death

0830-0930: JS dies in the backyard of his home at El Toro AFB. Col. Joe Underwood, the Sabow family’s next door neighbor, is home but doesn’t hear the gun shot.

0845 – Lt. Col. Gary Albin comes to the Sabow residence to return a flight-test booklet he borrowed. He knocked on the door, but there was no answer. He lingers at the front porch for 10 minutes until JU bumps into him on his way to have coffee with JS (NCIS Investigation Report) [1]

0930 – SS returns home. The TV in the living room is on mute. The dogs are in the garage. SS goes outside to the backyard and discovers the dead body of JS. SS heads over to the Underwood’s and notifies them of her husband’s death.

0930 – Underwood calls Gen. Adams at headquarters. Gen. Adams notifies the provost martial Maj. Goodrow and his deputy Capt. Fouquer. They are the first to arrive at the scene. Sgt. Randy Robinson an MP patrolling the area intercepted the radio call from Gen. Adams and is the next to arrive on scene.

March

08

General Wayne Rich takes five pages of notes during telephone call with Deputy Staff Judge Advocate in Washington DC.

09

Dr. David Sabow and widow Sally Sabow attend a meeting with Assistant to the Attorney General Wayne Rich, General J.K. Davis, General David Shuter, General Adams and others at ET AFB. The meeting is in response to claims that the Sabow family was going to contact the LA TIMES regarding the death of JS. The 5 hour meeting is described by DS as being about intimidation and an attempt to slander the reputation of JS and shame DS and SS into silence. Both SS and DS were warned that they should not speak to the media.

June

DS receives documents from a secret source at El Toro. The documents include a 5 page hand written summary by Wayne Rich based on a telephone call with the deputy SJA in Washington DC, Col. Lang on 3/8/91, the day before his meeting. The packet also included an order from one legal officer to another regarding ways to have Dr. Sabow’s medical license revoked.

General Carl E. Mundy, Jr.

July

02

General Carl E. Mundy Jr. becomes Commandant of the Marine Corps.  The briefing paper on the death of Col Sabow is discoverable.

October

DS obtains the autopsy report and other forensic materials regarding JS death.

December

Second JAGMAN investigation was conducted into the death of Col. Jim Sabow.  Conclusion about cause of death remained suicide.

William S. Sessions

17

David Sabow sends a letter to FBI Director William Sessions requesting a comprehensive investigation into the death of Col. James Sabow.

1992

February

04

The FBI writes David Sabow stating that the death of Col. Sabow has already been investigated by the NIS, the Orange County Sheriff / Coroner’s Office, and a Marine Corps Judge Advocate (not an investigation according to Verducci). They will not conduct an independent investigation.

1993

June

17

Connie Chung, CBS “Eye to Eye” Bernard Goldberg takes a similar attitude [combination of sympathy and skepticism] toward the family of a Marine colonel, James Sabow, who officials say committed suicide in 1991; his wife, children and brother maintain that he was murdered, probably by military brass trying to cover up their activities in the drug trade.

1994

January

22

David Sabow writes a letter to President Bill Clinton

May

11

Assistant Attorney General Frank Hunger responds to David Sabow’s letter to the President. They inform Dr. Sabow that since he is behind present litigation against the Federal Government they cannot comment on the matter.

June

20

Dr. Jack Feldman (UCLA) writes and signs an affidavit stating, “Colonel Sabow was rendered unconscious or immobile by a blow to the head that fractured the base of the skull, causing bleeding into the pharynx. Breathing continued after this injury, aspirating blood into the lung. Sometime later, a shotgun was placed in the mouth and triggered, causing death and obscuring any evidence of prior injury.”

December

David Sabow meets with FBI Agent Bill Grode at the South Dakota District office.

1995

May

09

David Sabow writes a letter to new FBI Director Louis Freeh stating that FBI Agent Bill Grode believes that based on David Sabows’ investigation the Sabow case needs a thorough re-investigation by the FBI.

June

02

John Collingwood with the FBI responds to David Sabow’s May letter and reiterates that the death Col. Sabow has been investigated thoroughly and that there is no evidence of anything but a suicide.

13

David Sabow responds to Collingwoods’ letter stating all his facts that supports his hypothesis that his brother was murdered.

1995

October

19

David Sabow gets Senator Tom Daschle (D-SD) to send a letter to FBI Director Louis Freeh requesting the FBI conducts an investigation into the death of Col. James Sabow.

1996

“Freeway” Ricky Ross is busted for trying to buy 100 kilograms of cocaine from an undercover FBI Agent.  Ross was an informant in Gary Webb’s Dark Alliance articles. He was the major distributor of crack cocaine in LA and received his supply from Oscar Danilo Blandon who raised money for the Contra’s in Nicaragua.

 

16

Radiologist Dr. Dennis E. Nesbit reviewed Col. Sabow’s skull x-rays and concluded that there was a depressed or displaced skull fracture – evidence of an inward not outward fracture.

21

Dr. David Rubinstein with the Department of Radiology at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center looked over the x-ray material sent to him by David Sabow. Dr. Rubinstein, “several Neuroradiologist and one neurosurgeon.” All concluded evidence of a depressed skull fracture that is atypical of a shotgun blast to the mouth.[2]

April

02

Kent B. Remley, MD with the University School of Medicine sends a letter to David Sabow stating that “A depressed skull fracture of the occipital bone is demonstrated on the right with the extent of depression measuring approximately 1.5 cm.  To sustain a depressed skull fracture of this type, it would be necessary to inflict a large force locally to this region. Furthermore, the extent of swelling over the fracture that is visualized on the photographs would indicate that the fracture was sustained prior to the fatal gunshot wound.” The case evidence was reviewed by Dr. Remley, two other neuroradiologists and three neurosurgeons who all agreed that was evidence of “blunt force trauma on the back right side of Col. Sabow’s head.” [3]

June

11

The Inspector General’s office with the DoD concluded in a formal document that Col. Sabow’s death was the result of a self – inflicted gunshot wound. (3rd investigation). The investigation included interviewing 39 persons.

1997

April

08

David Sabow gets Senator Rod Grams (R-MN) to write a letter to FBI Director Louis Freeh requesting the FBI conducts an investigation into the death of Col. James Sabow.

June

27

John Collingwood with the FBI responds to Senator Rod Grams letter stating that unless ordered to do so by the US Attorney’s Office or the Department of Justice.

July

24

FBI Agent Bill Grode writes a letter to David Sabow stating that based on all the evidence presented to him the FBI should investigate the cause of death of Col. Sabow was murdered.

1999

December

01

Robert Walsh of the FBI responds to a letter from Congressman Jon Thune (R-SD) on behalf of David Sabow stating the there is no reason to believe that Col. Sabow’s death was not a suicide and they will not investigate the matter further.

2000

February

David Sabow meets with Deputy DA of Orange County Mike Jacobs who tells DS that his brother was murdered and that he will help to amend the cause of death listed as suicide in the autopsy report. But the Sheriff/Coroner refuses to even discuss the case with him.

2001

January

01

David Sabow writes another letter to FBI Director Louis Freeh.

25

Dr. Anthony Battista sends a letter to FBI Agent Jim Kallstrom urging that he take a look at the case evidence regarding the death of Col Sabow.

28

Dr. Anthony Battista writes a letter to FBI Agent Brian Underwood

2001

January

01

John Collingwood write David Sabow acknowledging receipt of his latest letter to FBI Director Louis Freeh. He writes that they’ve exhausted all leads but continue to look into the case.

May

29

The FBI under the request of Director Louis Freeh begin investigating the death of Col. Sabow.

October

30

The FBI publishes their investigation conducted by the Behavior Analysis Unit. They used the 2 JAGMAN reports, autopsy reports, death scene photos, x-rays, and the OIG Report of the NIS investigation (6/5/96). They essentially investigated the previous investigations.

2003

Deputy DA of Orange County Mike Jacobs calls David Sabow and asks him if he will participate in a case evidence presentation to the new Sheriff/Coroner of Orange County Mike Corona and his staff. Jacobs is informed that Corona is, “not interested.”

Senators Pat Leahy (D-Vermont] and Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) sent a joint letter to the FBI demanding that the investigation into Col. Sabow’s death be reopened. The FBI wrote back and told the two senators that it had already conducted a review of the evidence and concluded it was a suicide.

2004

Mike Jacobs writes a letter to Congressman Duncan Hunter (R-CA) and informs him of his efforts at getting the record corrected about Col. Sabow’s cause of death.

David Sabow gets Congressman Duncan Hunter (R-California) Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, to attach an amendment to a military authorization bill (Subsection 584) ordering the Secretary of Defense to re-investigate the death of Col. Sabow.  The bill states that a “Board Certified Forensice Pathologist without any government connections to conduct the re-investigation.” The work was supposed to go to the Iowa State University, but they refused. It was then assigned to Dr. Jon Nordby (PhD in Philosophy) with no medical degree. Most of Nordby’s forensic training was with the FBI at Quantico. In his CV on his website, Nordby lists the DOD as one of the clients he has performed services for in the past.

October

07

Jon Nordby submits his findings to the Department of Defense and concludes that the death of Col. James Sabow was properly ruled a suicide.

December

09

Journalist Gary Webb who wrote about CIA drug trafficking in the 1980s in a series of articles and later a book titled “Dark Alliance” is found dead in his home – the victim of an apparent suicide. Webb apparently shot himself twice in the head with .38 caliber revolver.

2006

February

David Sabow hires Bryan Burnett to re-examine the case evidence. Burnett submits his own report that concludes Col. Sabow was murdered. Key findings include testing the original Ithaca shotgun, no GSR found on Col. Sabow’s right hand, bite marks on JS lips and tongue which suggests seizure activity prior to the shotgun wound, depressed skull fracture on the right side of JS skull, lack of blood and fingerprints on the shotgun etc.

September

25

9/25/06  Based on findings from Bryan Burnett, Jon Nordby submits a second report based on newly received crime scene evidence including the Ithaca Shotgun and Col. Sabow’s clothing. His conclusion remains the same as before.

12/24/06  Mike Jacobs (retired) sends a letter to Congressman Duncan Hunter contradicting the Nordby report and expressing his belief that Col. Sabow was murdered.

2007

February

06

J. Patrick Bedellat Wikipedia Talk Page on El ToroeI have no connection whatsoever with the case except for my conviction that murder is wrong (setting aside the professional questions associated with Col. Sabow’s occupation). My only involvement with the case is as an observer of the USG, DoD, USMC, etc. JPatrickBedell 09:36, 7 February 2007 (UTC)  He is blown off by others who conclude that the official investigations should be trusted, that this is a conspiracy theory, and that it has no place in an encyclopedic work.

April

19

Duncan Hunter sends a letter to Attorney General Alberto Gonzales to reopen the investigation into the death of Col. James Sabow

2010

March

04

John Patrick-Bedell drives cross-country from California to Washington DC. When he arrives at the Pentagon he opens fire on two policemen. Bedell is shot and killed. An investigation into a possible motive finds that Bedell was obsessed with the idea that Col. James Sabow was murdered.

Bob Romaine contacts Agent Julie Haney, with the NCIS Cold Case Unit at Camp Pendleton. She reviews the case evidence and informs David Sabow that, “This unquestionably was a homicide.”

Agent Haney gets a meeting with the Orange County Sheriff/Coroner that David Sabow and Bryan Burnett are not allowed to attend. The Sheriff/Coroner refuses to change the manner of death declaration.

September

05

Dr. Werner Spitz sends a report to Special Agent Julie Haney that upon reviewing all the case evidence he concludes that: There is evidence of a depressed skull fracture in the back of Col. Sabow’s head. The crime scene was likely tampered with and that the cause of death should’ve been ruled a homicide.

October

02

Agent Julie Haney sends a letter to David Sabow and Bob Romaine stating that she can no longer continue investigating the cause of death of Col. Sabow because they cannot prove external blunt force trauma in the case.

08

In a written affidavit, U.S. Army Special Agent Gene Wheaton, who conducted an investigation into the death of Col. Sabow, stated that upon reviewing his notes he was told by Officer Randy Robinson on 10/22/92 that there were two female agents at the Sabow house the morning of his death….one was named Julie. In a phone conversation, Wheaton asked Agent Julie Haney if she was the “Julie” that was at the Sabow house that morning and she replied, “yes”

2012

May

09

David Sabow sends case history to the State of California Attorney General for review.

FOR FOLLOW UP.

Jose A. Rodriguez Jr.

Over time he was promoted to Chief of Station in Panama, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic and ultimately Director of the Latin American Division.